Library Journey Maps 

Not a Postal Box! by M. Gifford via Flickr CC

photo by M. Gifford via Flickr CC  (this it isn’t the dropbox at my library)

Library programming often gets a lot of attention, but everyday tasks have the potential be frustrating and hinder library experiences.  These tasks can include everything between getting to the library, parking, entering the library, locating items to leaving the library and everything in between.  Mapping out common events is a great way to identify pain points and improve how patrons accomplish library tasks and goals.

Realistic Journey Map:  Returning a DVD after hours

I’m usually in a rush and often run as many errands as I can after hours.  This scenario happens a lot to me.

  1. Prepare items to return to the library
  2. Drive to the library
  3. Park on the side
  4. Get out of car and run around to the drop box
  5. Put items in dropbox…but, wait, this one is a DVD, which says Do Not Put in the Dropbox.  Bummer.
  6. Take it home, to try to remember to return it the next day and hopefully avoid accruing late fees.

Not being able to return DVDs is a major painpoint for people who are strapped for time or need to return their items after hours.  I can go to the library when it is open, but the limited hours from 11 am – 6 pm prevents people who work during those hours from using the library features that are not available after hours.

Realistic Journey Map:  Returning a DVD after hours

  1. Prepare items to return to the library
  2. Drive to the library
  3. Park on the side
  4. Get out of car and run around to the drop box
  5. Put items in dropbox, including DVDs because we can now leave them in the dropbox

The solution is simple…allow people to return their DVDs in the dropbox…which may or may not happen.  What I can do is to conduct a journey map project for my library so we can address the painpoints and streamline services for our library patrons.

 

Schmidt, A. (2012). Stepping out of the library: The user experience. The Library Journal. Retrieved from http://lj.libraryjournal.com/2012/03/opinion/aaron-schmidt/stepping-out-of-the-library-the-user-experience/

 

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